Why can’t Moses Enter the Promised Land?

English: Moses Viewing the Promised Land, illu...

English: Moses Viewing the Promised Land, illustration from the 1890 Holman Bible (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Scholars throughout time have questioned the reason as to why Moses was not allowed to enter the Promise Land. The Bible tells us in Numbers 20:11-13 that it was because Moses had angrily struck the rock with his staff instead of speaking to it.

This incident is no longer a mystery when we understand the dual nature of the Divine Energies.

Grace/Light and Kundalini/Passion are opposing energies. They are the Divine Masculine, which is symbolically represented by light and water that fall from the sky, and the Divine Feminine, which is symbolically represented by fire and wine that rise up from the earth or is produced from the earth. In the tale of Plato’s Atlantis, we find that water destroys all that Passion has built. The same inference can be gained from the story of the Tower of Babel, which falls due to a lightening strike.

How is this knowledge relevant to Moses’ situation?

It is in the manner in which he uses the staff to obtain the water. When we understand the reciprocal law that states, “That which is within is also without,” it all comes together.

Moses is on a mission given by God. That means his Passion/Kundalini has been awakened and is in full flow. In order to keep the Kundalini flowing it is necessary to supplicate the Lord for what is needed. This supplication raises the Kundalini so that it can reach up to God, who will then send down Grace or a Blessing. Moses was told to do this, but he did not.

Moses took his staff and struck the rock not once, but twice, AND in anger. This is equivalent to God smiting the Tower of Babel with a lightning bolt. The staff had to come in a downward motion in order to strike the rock. Grace is used to discipline those who are driven by Kundalini. When you look at the societies whose main deity uses a thunderbolt to punish men, you will notice that they are all warrior-based societies. (Vikings and Roman)

Moses rained on his own parade.

Moses flooded his system with the Power of Grace and thus killed the Power of Passion or Kundalini that was fuelling his mission. Once the system is flooded, the inner fire is put out and Moses dies.

The lesson was learned and Joshua, the next leader of the Israelites, would not make that same mistake. Over a seven-day period, Joshua drums and trumpets the walls of Jericho down. This is supplication of the highest order and was the way that God had originally wanted Moses to attain water from the rock.

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My book, "Jesus' Wedding: A Peek into the Inner World Shrouded behind the Mystical Veil," will detail this universal system that explains all myth and spiritual symbol. It is planned to debut in December 2012. You are welcome to view the excerpts, models, and and photographs that are currently available on my website. http://www.JesusWedding.com

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One comment on “Why can’t Moses Enter the Promised Land?
  1. Massah and Meribah: the story is told twice. In Exodus, God says “strike the rock” and Moses does, as he struck the surface of the Nile. In Numbers, Moses strikes the rock and is condemned.

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